Tag Archives: Reverse Garbage Queensland

Revive style for planetary health

To the best of my knowledge, Brisbane is the first city in the world to host a pop-up secondhand fashion festival as a waste minimization strategy. I (Jane Milburn) have checked with New York refashion academic Sass Brown and Sass knows of no other.  Do tell if you believe otherwise.

Stiltwalkers showcase refashion at the 2016 Revive event in the heart of Brisbane. Photo by Brisbane City Council

Stiltwalkers showcase refashion at the 2016 Revive event in the heart of Brisbane. Photo by Brisbane City Council

Revive is in its second year and pops up again on 18 August 2017 at South Bank Forecourt from noon to 9pm. Hats off to Brisbane City Council, Cr Peter Matic and Cr David McLachlan for leadership. With textiles being one of the fastest growing domestic waste streams, fueled by fast-fashion turnover, I am proud to have been in the room at its conception.

The advent of Revive followed an opportunity I was granted to address a council meeting on a matter of public importance.  Here’s the link to my 2015 address (including Hansard pdf) when I spoke of the need to develop a more sustainable clothing culture. Revive is a huge step in this direction.

Infinite consumption in a finite world is unsustainable, in our hearts we all know that. That’s why reviving existing resources – including perfectly good clothing that needs a new body to enjoy it – is central to ensuring planetary health.

Revive is thriving this year with the introduction of a conversation tent, refashion workshops run by QUT and Reverse Garbage Queensland, a clothing story board and the Beaudesert Collection of treasured garments from earlier times. The major opshops will be there presenting unique and individual alternatives to fast fashion, with revivalist styling parades curated by Faye Delanty in collaboration with The Salvos. There’s food trucks and other entertainment too. The event is free and coincides with National Op Shop Week.

I’m dressing the stiltwalkers in natural-fibre refashions (see photos from last year below) and will be in the conversation tent at 4pm for 30 minutes, along with lots of other voices now speaking out about sustainable clothing.

You can book into free Clothing Repair Café and Clothing Revival workshop sessions at Brisbane Square Library which I’ll be running next week on behalf of Revive on August 23 and 24. Call 3403 4166 to secure a spot.  #ReviveBNE

Stiltwalkers in Textile Beat refashion at Revive 2016, photos by Brisbane City Council

Stiltwalkers showcase Textile Beat refashions at Revive 2016,  Photos by Brisbane City Council

Revive 2016 at South Bank in Brisbane, celebrating secondhand fashion as a sustainable way to dress for planetary health

Revive 2016 at South Bank in Brisbane, celebrating preloved as a sustainable choice for planetary health

Jane Milburn of Textile Beat at Revive 2016, with MC Carlie Wacker and Cr Peter Matic. Photos by Darcy Milburn

Jane Milburn of Textile Beat at Revive 2016, with MC Carlie Wacker and Cr Peter Matic. Photos by Darcy Milburn

Mendful, mindful, meaning in stitches

Mended garments carry a story of care. They reflect the triumph of imperfection over pretension while the act of mending itself brings transformation in both mender and mended.

By embracing repair as a valid and useful act we, the menders, are stitching new life-energy into something others step over in the scrabble onwards and upwards. To pause, apply creative problem-solving and add a mark of care to our clothes, we extend their life and bring meaning to our own.

The clothes we wear are a statement of values. We may go through stages of searching for newer, sharper images and think clothes, like makeup and leopard spots, can camouflage and attract the right sort of attention. Alas, the pipe dream.  Continue reading